Semicodeless P(Y)-code processing using high-rate aiding

Present schemes for semicodeless P(Y) processing assume an autonomous receiver that estimates W-code bits directly from the received signal. Given the limited C/N0 available, naturally the signals are noisy, resulting in squaring loss.

One simple way around this is to use more reliable estimates of the W bits acquired with a medium-gain antenna. These estimates can be published continuously in near-real-time by a suitable Internet-based service, then used by any client receiver, which could be a conventional real-time receiver or a recorded-waveform software receiver.

This need not be all that expensive. All that’s required is approximately one medium-gain antenna per satellite per hemisphere. A one-meter dish of 20 dB gain would reduce squaring loss to practically zero. Of course a reasonable Internet uplink is needed of 480 kbit/second for each satellite. Storage costs could be controlled by retaining the W bits for a limited time (a few weeks or months).

Another possibility, in a world where every receiver is uploading full RF waveforms to a central service, is to sum together the signals from many receivers before estimating the W bits. (If the summing is done prior to detection, this is effectively a phased-array antenna.) Quite a few signals would be needed, though, if each receiver has the usual omni antenna. Better to rely on dedicated medium-gain antennas.

The W-code bits would not be of any use to spoofers since they would be tens or hundreds of milliseconds out of date.

The same trick can be played with other unknown codes, such as the GPS M code or the PRS codes on other GNSS services. The bit rates of the published reference waveforms would be much higher than those of W-code, but perhaps the effort would be repaid by observables that could be obtained in no other way, helping with multipath and ambiguity resolution. In the limit of a totally unknown waveform, this is just VLBI.